Nicholas Kazanas

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Nicholas Kazanas (born 1939) is a Greek Indologist. He was born in 1939 in Chios, Greece.

He studied at University College, Economics and Philosophy at the School of Economic Science and Sanskrit at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, and did a post-graduate at SOAS and at Deccan College in Pune. He taught in London and Athens. Since 1980 he leads the Omilos Meleton Cultural Institute. He is on the Editorial Board of Adyar Library Bulletin.

His work was criticized by M Witzel, Richard Meadow, Martin Huld, Edwin Bryant, D. P. Agrawal, Asko Parpola, Stefan Zimmer, J. P. Mallory, Elena Kuzmina and others.[1]

He was one of the few contributors in a special volume of the Journal of Indo-European Studies on the Indo-Aryan migration theory who argued against the theory.[2] Kazanas' paper was criticized by nine scholars, among them JP Mallory. In the latter issue of the Journal of Indo-European Studies, Kazanas responded to all his critics in the article ‘Final Reply’.[2]

Works[edit]

  • Economic principles in the Vedic tradition 2010
  • Indo-Aryan origins and other Vedic issues 2009
  • Vedic and Mesopotamian interactions 2007
  • Vedic Vāc and Greek logos as creative power: a critical study 2009
  • "Indo-European Deities and the Rigveda," Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol. 29 (2001), p. 257.
  • "Indigenous Indo-Aryans and the Rigveda," Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol. 30 (2002), p. 275.
  • "Final Reply," Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol 31 (2003), p. 187.
  • "Rgveda 7.95.2 and Karen Thomson," Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol. 38 (2010), p. 409.
  • N. Kazanas, A new date for the Rgveda Philosophy and Chronology, (2000) ed. G C Pande & D Krishna, special issue of Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research (June, 2001)
  • Advaita & Gnosticism, VVRI Research Bulletin (Hoshiarpur), vol, 2 (43-112), 2003.
  • 1999 ‘The Rigveda and IndoEuropeans’ Annals Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, vol, 80 (pp 15–42).
  • 2001b ‘Archaic Greece and the Veda’ in ABORI, vol. 82, in press.
  • 2004 ‘Plato and the Upaniṣads’ in Brahmavidyā: Adyar Library Bulletin.
  • 2005 ‘Philosophy and Self-realization in the Ṛgveda’ Self Society and Science... ed D.P. Chattopadhyaya, PHISPC vol. XI, pt2 (21-42), N. Delhi, Centre for Studies in Civilization.
  • Anatolian bull and Vedic horse in the Indo-European diffusion. 2005. Adyar Library Bulletin (2003)
  • Coherence and preservation in Sanskrit VVRI 2006
  • Diffusion of Indo-European Theonyms: what they show us. 2005 .Quarterly Journal of the Mythic Society (Bangalore), vol. 97, no. 1 (Jan-March 2006).
  • Vedic and Mesopotamian cross-influences. 2004 (Published in Migration & Diffusion (Vienna) 2005 and by the Adyar Library Bulletin (2006: Olcott commemorative issue). This was also incorporated in the study Vedic, Mesopotamian and Egyptian Religiophilosophical Thought (in print by PHISPC in the volume Chain of Golden Civilizations)
  • 'Greek Philosophy up to Aristotle' November 2003. PHISPC
  • Vedic and Egyptian Affinities.(2002, 2006 in Puratattva. Also incorporated in the study Vedic, Mesopotamian and Egyptian Religiophilosophical Thought (in print by PHISPC in the volume Chain of Golden Civilizations))
  • 'Education & Ethics (presented at the New Delhi Conference organized by UNESCO and the Indian Ministry of Civilization on 'Dialogue among Civilizations: Quest for New Perspectives' 9–10 July 2003.)
  • Kazanas, Nicholas (2002). "Rigvedic town and ocean: Witzel vs Frawley" (PDF). 
  • 2001b ‘Archaic Greece and the Veda’ in ABORI, vol 82, in press.
  • 2001b ‘IndoEuropean Deities and the Rgveda’ Journal of Indo-European Studies vol 29, 257-93.
  • 2005 ‘Philosophy and Self-realization in the Ṛgveda’ Self Society and Science... ed D.P. Chattopadhyaya, PHISPC vol XI, pt2 (21-42), N. Delhi, Centre for Studies in Civilization.
  • The AIT and Scholarship, 2001
  • Kazanas, Nicholas: Rig Vedic Pur, 2004
  • Vedic religio-philosophic thought. 2003
  • 'Education & Ethics (presented at the New Delhi Conference organized by UNESCO and the Indian Ministry of Civilization on 'Dialogue among Civilizations: Quest for New Perspectives' 9-10th July 2003.)
  • Sanskrit and Proto-Indo-European'
  • 'Philosophy in Hellenistic and Roman Times.'

Notes[edit]

  1. V. Agarwal, A Reply to Michael Witzel’s ‘Ein Fremdling im Rgveda’1 (Journal of Indo-European Studies, Vol. 31, No.1-2: pp.107-185, 2003)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Indo-European Deities and the Rgveda Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol. 29 (2001), 257-93; Indigenous Indoaryans and the Rgveda Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol. 30 (2002), 275-334; Final Reply Journal of Indo-European Studies, vol. 31 (2003), 187-240.
  • Witzel, M. - The Kazanas Fiasco. 2001 (Review of The AIT and Scholarship by N.Kazanas)
  • The all-inclusiveness of the RV in the realm of mythology is also observable in the sphere of poetics. There is hardly a major poetic device in the various IE branches that is not present in the RV. A significant aspect, for example, is that in early Greek poetry (epics of Homer and Hesiod, and some epigraphic material) the fairly strict syllabic meter (the hexameter with its dactylic, iambic and other variants) is preponderant with only traces of alliteration; in Germanic poetry alliteration prevails while the syllabic meter is very loose: both are present in the RV. ...Early Irish poetry (6th century CE) has both meter and alliteration (and rhyme) but this hardly counts since the Irish poets knew these poetic devices “from Vergil and Ovid” and, of course, the Romans developed them from the Greek tradition. Of the Vedic poetic art Watkins writes: “The language of India from its earliest documentation in the Rigveda has raised the art of the phonetic figure to what many would consider its highest form”.
    • "Indo-European Deities and the Rigveda," JIES 29 (2001), p. 257.
  • That most mainstream philologists will react unfavourably to this thesis I take for granted. I know well in myself the force of habit and of attachment to deep-rooted notions that reacts more through emotional outbursts than cool rationality. I repeat that the issue of origins, of when and how, is one not for philologists but for archaeologists and experts in related fields. We owe it, other than to the peoples of India who, I think, have long been wronged (by their own faults no less than foreign influences), to truth itself, which is the primary concern of all of us, to consider this thesis without prejudice.
    • "Indigenous Indo-Aryans and the Rigveda," JIES 30 (2002), p. 275.

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